Home > Virtualization > Hyper-V : Correct Memory Sizing for Child and Root Partitions

Hyper-V : Correct Memory Sizing for Child and Root Partitions

 

Here are some recomendations about how you should size VM memory :

You must size it to reasonably handle the expected load at ordinary and peak times because insufficient memory can significantly increase response times and CPU or I/O usage.

When running Windows in the child partition, you can use the following performance counters within a child partition to identify whether the child partition is experiencing memory pressure and is likely to perform better with a higher VM memory size:

Performance counter

Suggested threshold value

Memory – Standby Cache Reserve Bytes

Sum of Standby Cache Reserve Bytes and Free and Zero Page List Bytes should be 200 MB or more on systems with 1 GB, and 300 MB or more on systems with 2 GB or more of visible RAM.

Memory – Free & Zero Page List Bytes

Sum of Standby Cache Reserve Bytes and Free and Zero Page List Bytes should be 200 MB or more on systems with 1 GB, and 300 MB or more on systems with 2 GB or more of visible RAM.

Memory – Pages Input/Sec

Average over a 1-hour period is less than 10.

 

 

Correct Memory Sizing for Root Partition

The root partition must have sufficient memory to provide services such as I/O virtualization, snapshot, and management to support the child partitions. The root partition should have at least 512 MB available. Using Server Core in the root partition leaves additional memory for the VMs to use (approximately 80 MB for commit charge on 64-bit Windows).

A good standard for the memory overhead of each VM is 32 MB for the first 1 GB of virtual RAM plus another 8 MB for each additional GB of virtual RAM. This should be factored in the calculations of how many VMs to host on a physical server. The memory overhead varies depending on the actual load and amount of memory that is assigned to each VM.

 

Categories: Virtualization
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