Archive

Archive for July, 2009

Windows 7 and Windows 2008 R2 RTM.

When will I get Windows 7 RTM?

When you can get RTM depends on who you are….

For Partners & OEMs:

ISV (Independent software vendor) and IHV (Independent hardware vendor) Partners will be able to download Windows 7 RTM from Microsoft Connect or MSDN on August 6th. There is already a lot of momentum from ISVs and IHVs in the ecosystem today for Windows 7 as Mike Nash blogged last week. If you are a partner who has been working on Windows 7 for a while, now is the time to complete your testing with final version of Windows 7. For partners that haven’t gotten started yet with Windows 7, now is the time to get involved. You can also visit www.readyset7.com to learn more about getting ready for Windows 7.

Microsoft Partner Program Gold/Certified Members will be able to download Windows 7 RTM in English through the Microsoft Partner Network (MPN) Portal on August 16th. By October 1st, the remaining languages will become available to download.

Microsoft Action Pack Subscribers will be about to download Windows 7 RTM in English starting August 23rd. By October 1st, the remaining languages will become available to download.

OEMs will receive Windows 7 RTM software images beginning approximately 2 days after we officially RTM, as a little time is required to release and distribute these images. This will allow them to begin preparing images for new PCs to ship with Windows 7 on them. We know our OEMs are excited for Windows 7 and we can’t wait to hand them the final RTM bits!

For Business Customers:

If you are a Volume License (VL) customer with an existing Software Assurance (SA) license you will be able to download Windows 7 RTM in English starting August 7th via the Volume License Service Center (VLSC). The rest of the languages for Windows 7 RTM should be available within a couple of weeks after that.

Volume License customers without a SA license will be able to purchase Windows 7 through Volume Licensing on September 1st as we announced last week at WPC09. Mark these dates on your calendar and start making your deployment plans!

For IT Professionals:

There are a few ways you can get Windows 7 RTM. IT Professionals with TechNet Subscriptions will be able to download Windows 7 RTM in English on August 6th and remaining languages by October 1st.

IT Professionals at companies with Volume Licensing see above on how you can get Windows 7 RTM.

We have quite a bit of resources for IT Professionals to use to become experts on Windows 7 and to aid in their deployments. Those resources can be found at the Springboard Series.

For Developers:

Developers with MSDN Subscriptions will be able to download Windows 7 RTM in English on August 6th and remaining languages by October 1st.

To help developers who are developing applications for Windows 7 or updating existing applications to take advantage of new Windows 7 features, check out the Windows 7 for Developers Blog. Also, be sure to check out the Windows 7 Developers Guide on MSDN. Oh and there are also some fantastic videos on Channel 9 too!

For Beta Testers & Enthusiasts:

A special thank you to our beta testers is needed for their time and effort in helping make Windows 7 a solid release. The special pre-order offer we did offering Windows 7 Home Premium and Windows 7 Professional at almost 50% discount was done with our beta testers in mind. And many of you jumped at the chance to take advantage of this deal – thank you!

I know there have been some rumors going around about a “family pack” for Windows 7. We have heard a lot of feedback from beta testers and enthusiasts over the last 3 years that we need a better solution for homes with multiple PCs. I’m happy to confirm that we will indeed be offering a family pack of Windows 7 Home Premium (in select markets) which will allow installation on up to 3 PCs. As I’ve said before, stay tuned to our blog for more information on this and any other potential offers.

Beta testers will not automatically receive a free copy of Windows 7. Many beta testers are already subscribers to TechNet; those of you who fit that description will be able to download Windows 7 RTM shortly after RTM happens for free as part of your subscription.

However, if you don’t have TechNet and are waiting for GA (to either purchase Windows 7 or wait for your pre-order to arrive) you can continue to use the RC. In fact, you can continue to use it until it expires on June 1st, 2010 (expiration actually starts March 1, 2010, this is when the reboots start).

While our special pre-order offer with the near 50% has ended, Windows 7 can still be pre-ordered today from the various online retailers (including the Microsoft Store).

We are also going to release an evaluation of Windows 7 Professional for IT Professionals via the Springboard Series shortly after RTM. Over 40% of beta testers are IT Professionals and this will allow them to quickly access the RTM code and plan for deployments.

For Consumers:

Windows 7 will be in retail stores and shipping on new PCs starting October 22nd. If you pre-ordered Windows 7, it should be delivered sometime around the October 22nd timeframe (depends on the retailer).

Categories: Microsoft

Be Ready Windows Server 2008 R2 is coming ( Free Seminars ) : Updated

Would you like to know the new features of Server 2008 R2? Windows Server 2008 R2 extends the award winning features of Windows Server 2008, and now comes with new features to enable organizations to increase reliability and flexibility .

New virtualization tools, Web resources, management enhancements and exciting Windows 7 integration all help save time, reduce costs, and provide a platform for an efficient managed data center, including powerful tools such as Internet Information Services (IIS) version 7.5, updated Server Manager and Hyper-V platforms and Windows PowerShell version 2.0.

We will also talk about how Windows Server 2008 R2 works better together with Windows 7’s new features like branch caching, VPN etc, and Microsoft Exchange Server experts will talk about Exchange Server 2010 and how it integrates better with the new Active Directory control center in Server 2008 R2 . Also about Windows Hyper-V R2 :  what’s new features comes with this award solution : Clustered Shared Volumes, Live Migration, Storage Migration(SCVMM R2) and more.

This seminar(s) is for people who like to learn about new technologies. All presentations will be delivered by Microsoft MVPs & MCTs who are experts in their field.

To attend these seminars is FREE but places are limited and all attendees have the chance to win copies of Windows Server 2008, WS08 R2 RC on dvd, and relevant MS Press books.

We are running 4 big events in Sydney, Melbourne , Brisbane & Perth and we will run 6 medium events in major cities for the ones who missed the big launch events. And of course we did not forget the other cities.More  dates will be advised soon.

30/07/2009 Parramatta  32/181 Church St. Parramatta NSW 2150 (CEO Training)

Bookings :http://parraws08r2.eventbrite.com

12 /08 /2009  Sydney 1 Epping Rd.  North Ryde NSW 2113 ( Microsoft Office)

Bookings : http://aufirestarter.eventbrite.com

19 /08 /2009 Canberra – Suite 1, Level 3, CCG House, The Boulevard, 219 London Circuit Canberra, ACT, 2601 (CEO TRAINING)

Bookings : http://server2008r2.eventbrite.com

26 /08 /2009 Melbourne – L3, 85 Queen St. Victoria ( Advanced Training)

Bookings : http://mel1firestarter.eventbrite.com

02/09 /2009 Canberra – Suite 1, Level 3, CCG House, The Boulevard, 219 London Circuit Canberra, ACT, 2601 (CEO TRAINING)

Bookings : http://windowsr2.eventbrite.com

16/09 2009 Adalaide  TBA Bookings :

23/ 09 /2009 Brisbane – Ground Floor,  62 Astor Terrace, Spring Hill QLD  4000 ( ITTS)

Bookings : http://brisbanewindows.eventbrite.com
Speakers :

Cem Erdal Ozkaya , MVP/MCT
Edvaldo Alessandro Cardoso, MVP/ MCT

For more details please e-mail : eozkaya@ceotraining.com.au  or  alessandrocardoso@live.com

 

Categories: Microsoft

Hyper-v R2 : Processor Compatibility

Processor Compatibility

With Hyper-V R2, Microsoft include a new Processor Compatibility feature. Processor compatibility allows you to move a virtual machine up and down multiple processor generations from the same vendor.

Here’s how it works:

When a Virtual Machine (VM) is started on a host, the hypervisor exposes the set of supported processor features available on the underlying hardware to the VM. This set of processor features are called guest visible processor features and are available to the VM until the VM is restarted.

When a VM is started with processor compatibility mode enabled, Hyper-V normalizes the processor feature set and only exposes guest visible processor features that are available on all Hyper-V enabled processors of the same processor architecture, i.e. AMD or Intel.  This allows the VM to be migrated to any hardware platform of the same processor architecture. Processor features are "hidden" by the hypervisor by intercepting a VM’s CPUID instruction and clearing the returned bits corresponding to the hidden features.

Just so we’re clear: this still means AMD<->AMD and Intel<->Intel. It does not mean you can Live Migrate between different processor vendors AMD<->Intel or vice versa.

In addition, you may be aware that both AMD and Intel have provided similar capabilities in hardware, Extended Migration and Flex Migration respectively. Extended and Flex Migration are cool technologies available on relatively recent processors, but this is a case where providing the solution in software allows us to be more flexible and provide this capability to older systems too. Processor Compatibility also makes it easier to upgrade to the newest server hardware. In addition, Hyper-V Processor Compatibility can be done on a per VM basis (it’s a checkbox) and doesn’t require any BIOS changes.

Time To Get Uber-Geeky

Now that I’ve explained what processor compatibility mode does and the flexibility provides, I’m guessing there are a few propeller heads who want to go further and know exactly what a "normalized processor" means from a processor feature standpoint. Happy to oblige. When a VM in processor compatibility mode is started, the following processor features are hidden from the VM:

Host running AMD based processor

Host running Intel based processor

SSSE3, SSE4.1, SSE4.A, SSE5, POPCNT, LZCNT, Misaligned SSE, AMD 3DNow!, Extended AMD 3DNow!

SSSE3, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, POPCNT, Misaligned SSE, XSAVE, AVX

FAQ

Q: What happens if a vendor has written an application that uses one of these features that isn’t visible with processor compatibility enabled?

A: Since the feature isn’t exposed to the virtual machine, the application won’t "see it" and it’s up to the application to determine how to proceed; however, there are two likely paths.

Path 1: The application will check to see if a specific processor feature is available and use it if it’s available. If the processor features isn’t available, it will use a different code path. Remember that applications that make use of these advanced processor features are generally written in a flexible fashion to accommodate the servers in market today and there are still thousands of older Xeons and Opterons on the market that don’t have some of the latest processor features.

Path 2: The application requires a specific processor feature and refuses to launch. At this point in time, we haven’t found any application that fall into this category. It’s possible they exist, but we haven’t hit one yet. Since we can’t test every application out there, processor compatibility is defaulted off. (We’re conservative by nature.).

BTW, if there were issues with Hyper-V Processor Compatibility, you’d also see it with other virtualization products which rely on underlying hardware capabilities to mitigate this problem as well.

Q: Does processor compatibility have a hardware requirement? Does it require Intel Flex Migration or AMD Extended Migration?

A: Hyper-V processor compatibility mode has no dependencies on these technologies.

Q: Does Hyper-V processor compatibility allow you to migrate a VM from an AMD host to an Intel host and vice versa?

A: No. Processor compatibility allows you to move a virtual machine up and down multiple processor generations from the same vendor. It does not allow migrating a VM (with or without processor compatibility mode) from AMD based hosts to Intel based hosts, and vice versa.

Again :

AMD<->AMD and Intel<->Intel.

Source : Windows Virtualization Team Blog.
http://blogs.technet.com/virtualization/archive/2009/05/12/tech-ed-windows-server-2008-r2-hyper-v-news.aspx

 

Categories: Virtualization

SCVMM R2 : NEW Quick Storage Migration (QSM)

Quick Storage Migration (QSM) In Brief

As you may have seen, we recently released the Release Candidate for System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2. One of the most anticipated features of SCVMM 2008 R2 is Quick Storage Migration (QSM) which enables the migration of the storage of VM from one location to another. For example, suppose you have virtual machines on a leased SAN (SAN 1). The lease runs out and you decide to upgrade to a new SAN (SAN 2) with more capacity, better performance and additional capabilities. Quick Storage Migration allows you to move the virtual machine which resides on SAN 1 to SAN 2. I have had a number of request for more details on how this works so we’ve written this brief guide to QSM. (In addition, we wanted to make this technology broadly available, not just the biggest enterprises. More on that below.)

QSM relies on Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V and Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS). QSM can move the virtual disks of a running virtual machine independent of storage protocols (iSCSI, FC) or storage type (local, DAS, SAN), with minimal downtime.

QSM Is One of Many Migration Technologies Supported in Virtual Machine Manager’s Portfolio

VM Migration Type

Platforms available on

Technology used for transfer

Expected downtime for VM

Live Migration

  • Hyper-V
    (2008 R2)
  • ESX 3.0, 3.5
  • Windows Server 2008 Failover Cluster
  • Hyper-V
  • vMotion for ESX

None

  • No service interruption while virtual machine is moved

Quick Migration

  • Hyper-V
  • Windows Server 2008 Failover Cluster
  • Hyper-V

Under 1 minute in most cases

  • VM is put into save-state while it is moved from one cluster node to another using the cluster failover mechanism

SAN Migration

  • Virtual Server
  • Hyper-V
  • Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V and Virtual Disk Service (VDS) Hardware Providers
  • N-Port Identification Virtualization (NPIV) on Emulex and QLogic Fibre Channel HBAs
  • iSCSI on EMC, HP, Hitachi, NetApp, EquiLogic arrays

Under 1 minute in most cases

  • VM is put into save-state while it is moved from one virtual machine host to another using unmasking and masking operations at the SAN level

Network based migration

(aka LAN migration)

  • Virtual Server
  • Hyper-V
  • ESX
  • BITS for Virtual Server and Hyper-V
  • sFTP for ESX

Minutes to hours (W2K8, W2K3 hosts)

  • VM needs to be stopped or in saved state for the entire duration of transfer

Under 1 minute in most cases (W2K8 R2)

  • VM can remain running for the almost entire duration of the transfer of its virtual disks from once storage location to another
  • VM is put into save-state for a brief interval to migrate its memory state and associated differencing disks.

Storage Migration Type

Platforms available on

Technology used for transfer

Expected downtime

Storage vMotion

  • ESX 3.5
  • Storage vMotion

None

  • No perceived service interruption while the virtual disks associated with a virtual machine are moved from storage location to another

Quick Storage Migration

  • Hyper-V
    (2008 R2)
  • BITS and Hyper-V

Under 1 minute in most cases (W2K8 R2)

  • VM can remain running for the almost the entire duration of the transfer of its virtual disks from once storage location to another
  • VM is put into save-state for a brief interval to migrate its memory state and associated differencing disks.

Note on Processor Compatibility Mode:

To increase the mobility of a running virtual machine across hosts with different processor versions (with in the same processor family), Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V offers Processor Compatibility Mode. This feature masks processor feature differences between the source and destination hosts. With this enabled, you can migrate a virtual machine from a host with Pentium 4 VT processors to a host with Nehalem processors. Processor Compatibility Mode does not require advanced processor features like Intel VT Flex Migration or AMD-V Extended Migration. For more on Processor Compatibility Mode, check out Jeff’s Blog a few weeks ago where he goes into detail here.

 

How QSM Compares To VMware Storage VMotion

 

VMM 2008 R2 + Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V

VMware (vCenter 2.5 + ESX 3.5)

Migration of virtual machines across two hosts with independent storage

Supported

Not Supported

Migration of virtual machines with snapshots

Supported

Not Supported

Migration of Virtual machine with Virtual Disks

Supported

Supported (persistent mode)

Requires sufficient resources to support two instances of the virtual machines running concurrently

Not Required

Required

Additional Licensed Required

None

VMotion License

Number of concurrent storage Migrations allowed

10

4

Storage Migrations supported in the Administrator Console

Yes (QSM and Storage vMotion)

No

Storage Migrations supported in the CLI

Yes (QSM and Storage vMotion)

Yes

Protocol agnostic

Yes

Yes

Support for migrations of VMs and storage between hosts with different processors versions (same manufacturer)

Yes (use Hyper-V R2 Processor Compatibility Mode to increase the number of compatible hosts )

Not Applicable

 

Categories: Virtualization

Removing Virtual Networks : Script

 
 

You see this error message because the switch protocol is already enabled on that NIC.  It’s enabled either because there is already a virtual network using that adapter or because something or someone enabled it incorrectly.  If you already have a virtual network using that NIC, you can’t use that NIC on two virtual networks.

 If you ever need to completely remove all virtual networks from your system, you could use one of the options below (I recommend extreme caution ):

Delete all your virtual networks.

I wouldn’t recommend running it remotely because it will tear down your network stack but it should restore it once completed.

/*
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation
 
Module Name:
 
    nvspscrub.js
 
*/

//
// VirtualSwitchManagementService object.  Logical wrapper class for Switch Management Service
//
function
VirtualSwitchManagementService(
    Server,
    User,
    Password
    )
{
    //
    // Define instance fields.
    //   
    this.m_VirtualizationNamespace  = null;
   
    this.m_VirtualSwitchManagementService = null;
       

    //
    // Instance methods
    //       
   
    VirtualSwitchManagementService.prototype.DeleteSwitch =
    function(
        VirtualSwitch
        )
       
    /*++

    Description:

        Deletes a virtual switch
       
    Arguments:

        VirtualSwitch – Msvm_VirtualSwitch object to delete

    Return Value:

        SWbemMethod.OutParameters object.

    –*/
   
    {
        var methodName = "DeleteSwitch";

        var inParams = this.m_VirtualSwitchManagementService.Methods_(methodName).inParameters.SpawnInstance_();

        inParams.VirtualSwitch = VirtualSwitch.Path_.Path;
       
        return this.m_VirtualSwitchManagementService.ExecMethod_(methodName, inParams);
    }
   
   
    VirtualSwitchManagementService.prototype.DeleteInternalEthernetPort =
    function(
        InternalEthernetPort
        )

    /*++

    Description:

        Deletes an internal ethernet port
       
    Arguments:

        InternalEthernetPort – Msvm_InternalEthernetPort to delete
       
    Return Value:

        SWbemMethod.OutParameters object.

    –*/

    {
        var methodName = "DeleteInternalEthernetPort";

        var inParams = this.m_VirtualSwitchManagementService.Methods_(methodName).inParameters.SpawnInstance_();
       
        inParams.InternalEthernetPort = InternalEthernetPort.Path_.Path;
       
        return this.m_VirtualSwitchManagementService.ExecMethod_(methodName, inParams);
    }
   
    VirtualSwitchManagementService.prototype.UnbindExternalEthernetPort =
    function(
        ExternalEthernetPort
        )

    /*++

    Description:

        Unbinds an external ethernet port from the virtual network subsystem.  Usually this method
         won’t be called directly
       
    Arguments:

        SwitchPort – Msvm_ExternalEthernetPort to unbind.

    Return Value:

        SWbemMethod.OutParameters object.

    –*/

    {
        var methodName = "UnbindExternalEthernetPort";

        var inParams = this.m_VirtualSwitchManagementService.Methods_(methodName).inParameters.SpawnInstance_();

        inParams.ExternalEthernetPort = ExternalEthernetPort.Path_.Path;
       
        return this.m_VirtualSwitchManagementService.ExecMethod_(methodName, inParams);
    }
   
    //
    // Utility functions
    //
   
    VirtualSwitchManagementService.prototype.WaitForNetworkJob =
    function(
        OutParams
        )

    /*++

    Description:

        WMI calls will exit with some type of return result.  Some will require
        a little more processing before they are complete. This handles those
        states after a wmi call.

    Arguments:

        OutParams – the parameters returned by the wmi call.

    Return Value:

        Status code

    –*/

    {
        if (OutParams.ReturnValue == 4096)
        {
            var jobStateStarting        = 3;
            var jobStateRunning         = 4;
            var jobStateCompleted       = 7;
   
            var networkJob;

            do
            {
                WScript.Sleep(1000);
               
                networkJob = this.m_VirtualizationNamespace.Get(OutParams.Job);

            } while ((networkJob.JobState == jobStateStarting) ||
                     (networkJob.JobState == jobStateRunning));

            if (networkJob.JobState != jobStateCompleted)
            {
                throw(new Error(networkJob.ErrorCode,
                                networkJob.Description + " failed: " + networkJob.ErrorDescription));
            }
           
            return networkJob.ErrorCode;
        }

        return OutParams.ReturnValue;
    }
   
    VirtualSwitchManagementService.prototype.GetSingleObject =
    function(
        SWbemObjectSet
        )

    /*++

    Description:

        Takes a SWbemObjectSet which is expected to have one object and returns the object

    Arguments:

        SWbemObjectSet – The set.

    Return Value:

        The lone member of the set.  Exception thrown if Count does not equal 1.

    –*/

    {
        if (SWbemObjectSet.Count != 1)
        {
            throw(new Error(5, "SWbemObjectSet was expected to have one item but actually had " + SWbemObjectSet.Count));
        }
       
        return SWbemObjectSet.ItemIndex(0);
    }

   
    //
    // Aggregate functions
    //
    VirtualSwitchManagementService.prototype.DeleteSwitchAndWait =
    function(
        VirtualSwitch
        )
       
    /*++

    Description:

        Deletes a switch
       
    Arguments:

        VirtualSwitch – Msvm_VirtualSwitch to delete
       
    Return Value:
   
        None.

    –*/
   
    {
        var outParams = this.DeleteSwitch(VirtualSwitch);

        var wmiRetValue = this.WaitForNetworkJob(outParams);

        if (wmiRetValue != 0)
        {
            throw(new Error(wmiRetValue, "DeleteSwitch failed"));
        }
    }
   
    VirtualSwitchManagementService.prototype.DeleteInternalEthernetPortAndWait =
    function(
        InternalEthernetPort
        )
    /*++

    Description:

        Deletes an internal ethernet port
       
    Arguments:

        InternalEthernetPort – Msvm_InternalEthernetPort to delete
       
    Return Value:

        SWbemMethod.OutParameters object.

    –*/
   
    {
        var outParams = this.DeleteInternalEthernetPort(InternalEthernetPort);

        var wmiRetValue = this.WaitForNetworkJob(outParams);

        if (wmiRetValue != 0)
        {
            throw(new Error(wmiRetValue, "DeleteInternalEthernetPortAndWait failed"));
        }
    }
   
   
    VirtualSwitchManagementService.prototype.UnbindExternalEthernetPortAndWait =
    function(
        ExternalEthernetPort
        )
    /*++

    Description:

        unbinds an internal ethernet port
       
    Arguments:

        ExternalEthernetPort – Msvm_ExternalEthernetPort to unbind
       
    Return Value:

        SWbemMethod.OutParameters object.

    –*/
   
    {
        var outParams = this.UnbindExternalEthernetPort(ExternalEthernetPort);

        var wmiRetValue = this.WaitForNetworkJob(outParams);

        if (wmiRetValue != 0)
        {
            throw(new Error(wmiRetValue, "UnbindExternalEthernetPortAndWait failed"));
        }
    }
   
    //
    // Constructor code
    //
   
    if (Server == null)
    {
        Server = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Network").ComputerName;
    }
   
    //
    // Set Namespace fields
    //
    try
    {
        var locator = new ActiveXObject("WbemScripting.SWbemLocator");

        this.m_VirtualizationNamespace = locator.ConnectServer(Server, "root\virtualization", User, Password);
    }
    catch (e)
    {
        this.m_VirtualizationNamespace = null;
       
        throw(new Error("Unable to get an instance of Virtualization namespace: " + e.description));
    }
   
    //
    // Set Msvm_VirtualSwitchManagementService field
    //
    try
    {
        var physicalComputerSystem =
                this.m_VirtualizationNamespace.Get(
                        "Msvm_ComputerSystem.CreationClassName=’Msvm_ComputerSystem’,Name=’" + Server + "’");
         
        this.m_VirtualSwitchManagementService = this.GetSingleObject(
                                                        physicalComputerSystem.Associators_(
                                                            "Msvm_HostedService",
                                                            "Msvm_VirtualSwitchManagementService",
                                                            "Dependent"));
    }
    catch (e)
    {
        this.m_VirtualSwitchManagementService = null;
       
        throw(new Error("Unable to get an instance of Msvm_VirtualSwitchManagementService: " + e.description));
    }
}

//
// main
//

var wshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell");

var g_NvspWmi   = null;

Main();

function Main()
{
 WScript.Echo("Looking for nvspwmi…");
 g_NvspWmi   = new VirtualSwitchManagementService();

 WScript.Echo("");
 WScript.Echo("Looking for internal (host) virtual nics…");
 var list = g_NvspWmi.m_VirtualizationNamespace.ExecQuery("SELECT * FROM Msvm_InternalEthernetPort");
 for (i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
 {
  var next = list.ItemIndex(i);
  WScript.echo(next.DeviceID);
  g_NvspWmi.DeleteInternalEthernetPortAndWait(next);
 }
 
 WScript.Echo("");
 WScript.Echo("Looking for switches…");
 list = g_NvspWmi.m_VirtualizationNamespace.ExecQuery("SELECT * FROM Msvm_VirtualSwitch");
 for (i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
 {
  var next = list.ItemIndex(i);
  WScript.echo(next.Name);
  g_NvspWmi.DeleteSwitchAndWait(next);
 }
 
 WScript.Echo("");
 WScript.Echo("Looking for external nics…");
 list = g_NvspWmi.m_VirtualizationNamespace.ExecQuery("SELECT * FROM Msvm_ExternalEthernetPort WHERE IsBound=TRUE");
 for (i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
 {
  var next = list.ItemIndex(i);
  WScript.echo(next.DeviceID);
  g_NvspWmi.UnbindExternalEthernetPortAndWait(next);
 }
 
 WScript.Echo("");
 WScript.Echo("Finished!");
}

 

Categories: Virtualization

Free Hyper-V training

 

 hyper-v_architectureMicrosoft is offering free Hyper-V training!

Microsoft is offering some free Hyper-V training. You will need to enter a specific access code 9350-Y2W6-3676 and sign in with your Live ID.  The course “Collection 6319 – Configuring Hyper-V in Windows Server 2008” includes the following modules:

1. An overview of the Hyper-V technology
2. Creating a virtual environment
3. Deploying systems in a virtual environment
4. Configuring high availability in a virtual environment
5. Administering a virtual environment with SCVMM

To sign up go to https://www.microsoftelearning.com/eLearning/enterCode.aspx

So, what are you waiting for?

 
Categories: Virtualization